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Parent: What are you reading?

  1. #1164892019-06-25 04:08:25Kirn said:

    Basically, still reading all the Pratchett's books.

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/wyrd_sisters1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/pyramids1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/guards_guards1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/eric1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/moving_pictures1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/reaper_man1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/witches_abroad1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/small_gods1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/lords_and_ladies_play1.jpg

    https://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/men_at_arms1.jpg

    Still doing 1 book a week, of course. In this time, I went through 3 witches series books, which really just parody the stories, so to say - Wyrd Systers mess up with your general idea of Shakespearean play, Witches Abroad smash to pieces fairy tales and Lords And Ladies cut into old British tales about faeries and magic forests.
    Notable are 2 standalone books exploring the ideas and faults of religion - Pyramids and Small Gods. After those two, Pratchett didn't really write anything specific about religion in his Discworld books, but I think it's only natural - both books explore the topic enough.
    Eric returns Rincewind back to the Disk (though, it does not save him from constant troubles), Reaper Man allows to better understand Death of the Diskworld (always great character) and Moving Pictures explores a way of how wild ideas get into this world. That one is very heavy-handed in its story, but it establishes some world principles that are used - more subtly - later.
    And of course there is Guards! Guards! - my favorite book of the series, introducing characters of the city watch, including Captain VImes - cynical drunkard who hates authority and all the people, but can't help doing what's right. The book - and the continuation in Men At Arms - explores the idea of making unlikely extras into heroes. Also, this is the storyline that is mostly like a detective novel - there's crime and someone did it and the crime needs to be solved. By luck, magic or by fighting a dragon.

    15 books in, and still reading, and it doesn't feel tiring at all. At this point there's already a stable Archchancellor of the magic university, and the rest of faculty becoming distinct, and with establishment of the guard storyline world will start building upwards on its ideas. But first, there's Soul Music - next book, that has death and rock'n'roll in it.