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  1. The Benjamin Franklin Effect


    #267412012-05-22 22:20:07acostoss said:

    How do you get people to like you? You do good things for them, right? I mean, they'll see you as a valuable person to them, and begin to become fond of you.

    Wrong.

    To get people to like you, you must get them to do favors for you. You become fond of people that you help, and dislike those you hurt. This is called the Benjamin Franklin Effect.

    Read the article for more.

  2. #269582012-05-24 11:04:50 *Spooky said:

    The Benjamin Franklin Effect is just another phenomena that falls under the theory of Cognitive Dissonance since the individual is mainly trying to undergo a process of altering their existing behavior by changing or adding further cognitions to modify their thought-processes, behavior, and/or beliefs.

    Individuals usually attempt to reduce dissonance as they become more self-aware because they may be afraid to suffer the impending negative consequences that may result as a product of their actions, which can be influenced by their beliefs and/or behavior. An individual may additionally try to justify particular behaviors by focusing heavily on short-term benefits. E.g., think about the various thought processes and internal justifications/changes that can take place within an individual's mindset during a in-depth social interaction between several members of an in-group clique.

    The Ben Franklin Effect also focuses on an observation which proposes that when an individual does a favor for someone that they dislike, they are more likely to increasingly warm-up to that person over a period of time.

  3. #269592012-05-24 11:15:29Gargron said:

    To get people to like you, you must get them to do favors for you.

    Okay. Also, this thread needs a "lifehacks" tag.

  4. #269982012-05-24 18:30:59Trev said:

    @Spooky: Astute observation.

    Another counter-intuitive example when it comes to asking favors is the fact that people are more likely to do a small favor for the person asking if they have previously declined a large favor. Of course, this is a gamble -- some people do not feel any guilt about breaking the social contract.

  5. #270462012-05-25 01:42:48 *Spooky said:
    @Spooky: Astute observation.

    Well, one of my majors is Psych after all.

    Another counter-intuitive example when it comes to asking favors is the fact that people are more likely to do a small favor for the person asking if they have previously declined a large favor. Of course, this is a gamble -- some people do not feel any guilt about breaking the social contract.

    That would be the "Door-In-The-Face Technique" and the opposite of this would be the "Foot-In-The-Door Technique".

  6. #275472012-05-28 09:41:27 *Emma025 said:

    Another is Newton affection. Many of things which we used today are created according to Newton's Law.

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