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is anime made not in japan really anime?

  1. #301192012-06-18 09:24:16break said:

    "The term anime is derived from French "dessin animé" for cartoon drawing, and "l'animation"; it was then adapted to Japanese, short for "animeshon", the Japanese pronunciation of the word "animation". This is because, before the Americans, the French were more familiar with Japanese cartoons and manga and for a time were Japan's primary consumer. Of course, once this art-form carried over the Atlantic, the rest was history. " (TvTropes)

  2. #301322012-06-18 11:56:22shafnat said:

    okay then, i guess i can't argue anymore with all your knowledge.. that was just my inside perspective, just like i said..

  3. #301332012-06-18 12:34:02 *eterno said:

    Who cares about which white people the Japanese stole the word from. The stolen word is still the same word and also, it's not like half of English vocabulary isn't stolen from French.

    And also that paragraph is weird

    "The term anime is derived from French "dessin animé" for cartoon drawing, and "l'animation"; it was then adapted to Japanese, short for "animeshon", the Japanese pronunciation of the word "animation".

    So, let me get this straight, the Japanese stole the word from French and they use it as a short form for "animeshon"? Here's the problem: 'animé' is pronounced the same way as the normal weeaboo pronunciation but 'l'animation' is prounounced la-ni-MAH-tion with the ma pronounced like in 'map' so it should be rendered in Japanese as "アニマション" instead of "アニメーション".

    And then there's this

    This is because, before the Americans, the French were more familiar with Japanese cartoons and manga and for a time were Japan's primary consumer.

    OK, so they used the word so that it'd be marketable to the French. Still the same pronunciation problem applies. It seems that what it really was, it was just a convenient coincidence that their short form is also French's short form.

    But enough about the Japanese. Before the term 'anime' came in vogue, 'Japanimation' was the term used to refer to animations from Japan. It wasn't until 'The Weeaboo Revolution' that we started calling them 'anime' just because the Japanese called every cartoon 'anime' and ignorant weeaboos insisted that it was the 'proper' term.

  4. #301462012-06-18 13:58:09break said:

    @eterno it pains em alittle taht yoru mroe knowledgeable then me in french even though i have french relatives, but yes, yoru right. i guess it kidna came from both sides or something. but tis intriguing what weaboos do, isnt it? just like most people who knwo the word outside of japan today insist that the word "otaku" exclusively refers to animefans, isntead of the atcual meaning of any kidn of really fanatical fan. its gotten to such a degree that its easier to just go along with them becuase its not liek we have another own term for us.
    @Xyopq tahst teh first i hear of taht...

  5. #301472012-06-18 14:35:18eterno said:

    @TokoyamiSenshi

    "動画" meaning itself has shifted throughout the years. It now also refers to 'video' as in moving pictures encoded digitally.

    The term was first proposed by a Japanese animator, Kenzō Masaoka in 1943. It's still used nowadays to refer to cartoons as well as videos. A good example of its usage as video is of course in the popular weeaboo video website, ニコニコ動画 (niconicodouga)

    But still, it was the first proposed term for cartoons before they decided to adopt other terms and ultimately, adopted 'アニメ'

  6. #301932012-06-18 20:49:03cloluna said:

    this really ended up being a fued over where the term originated from. okay so, if its japanimation from a country outside of a japan, would you still watch it? if it looks like japanimation, and its just as good as some popular japanimation shows, then its still considered japanimation. i mean, does it nessecarily have to made in the country to be true japanimation?

  7. #301942012-06-18 21:05:16Momimochi said:

    i mean, does it nessecarily have to made in the country to be true japanimation?

    With the way you phrased it using japanimation, yup.

  8. #301962012-06-18 21:54:56Settsuo-kun said:
    Well it's better than before.

    if its japanimation from a country outside of a japan, would you still watch it?


    If it's good why not.

    if it looks like "Japanese inspired"animation, and its just as good as some popular "Japanese inspired"animation shows, then its still considered "Japanese inspired"animation. i mean, does it nessecarily have to made in the country to be true "Japanese Inspired" animation?


    I personally don't think so. A prime example being Huntik. It's Italian based, but still considered "anime".
  9. #301992012-06-18 22:04:57 *TokoyamiSenshi said:

    Here's a fundamental question. It will shake you up good.

    Does it really matter?

    @eterno: archaic implies that it's no longer used so that might seem like misuse to anal people.

  10. #302042012-06-18 22:43:29cloluna said:

    @Settsuo-kun something about huntik just doesn't seem very anime style to me. kinda feels like a combo of anime and scooby doo style i guess you could say. but anyway, i agree with u, it doesn't need to be from japan to make it anime. i created this thread to see what others though about it ^.^

  11. #302172012-06-19 01:39:45Sammi said:

    I think its a bit pointless to think about it.

    Just stop thinking about it, and enjoy the many animated shows Japan and other countries have to offer.

  12. #309262012-06-24 04:22:47Sol420 said:

    The term anime is used to refer specifically to animated works from Japan. So going strictly by definition, Anime can only come from japan. Alot of shows take heavy influence from anime but if it's not from japan then it's usually not conisdred an Anime.

    and also: @13 how is dubbed anime not "Legit anime" It's the same show just with a different audio track for the voices. I honestly don't see how being dubbed or not affects the legitimacy of the show.